Demystifying the world of sports photography

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Money Money Money

We’ve tried quite diligently to keep this site and the podcast focused on helping people become better sports photographers. We don’t talk much about gear because making great pictures is largely independent of that, and we don’t talk about how to make money shooting sports because (among other reasons) the process of making great pictures is often bad for business in the short term. But as some of the readers/listeners who have incorporated our methods and philosophy improve to the point where they are good enough to get noticed, I do feel some responsibility to illuminate the next part of the path.

Sports photography is not a cheap endeavor. I guess you could shoot skateboarding with only a fisheye, but for everything else, it’s going to get expensive very quickly. Let’s say you’re new and you splurge on a prosumer DLSR and a 70-200 2.8. At minimum you’re $3,000 in already. There are lots of things you can shoot with that combination, and you can certainly improve your skills to the point where you’re a competent photographer. But you’re limited. Football and futbol, baseball and motorsports are going to be a problem because only so much action is going to happen close enough to you to consistently get quality high-impact pictures. You know from listening to us that given what you want to shoot, you need a longer lens and you need it quickly, either because you want to be able to make the pictures you’re missing or because clients are interested in hiring you based on the work you were able to do with shorter lenses, or both. And this is where the options get a bit scary and where the choices with the smaller price tag might end up being the more expensive ones long term.

This post is partially inspired by a discussion in our Flickr group. It’s a common mistake to think that the if 200 is not long enough, then 300 should do it. And given the price difference between 200-300-400, it seems like an easy choice. But what you don’t know is that 300 is no more of a field sports lens than 200, and you’ll end up selling it at a loss to buy a 400 anyway. So many people have made this mistake, including…Matt Cohen. It’s not fun. But take it from me, 400 is for field sports, and 300 is for tight spaces where you still want to shoot tight. Pros who shoot field sports mostly carry two bodies, one with a 70-200, and one with a 400. The question came up about buying a used 400, and that’s fine, but you should buy it from a retailer who has a used department and at least some incentive to make good if you get a lemon (KEH, B&H, Adorama), and not from a pro who is probably very rough with his gear. Still, a used 400 in good working condition is going to be expensive. And you have to decide if it’s worth it to you. Do you feel like you’re leaving money on the table that a 400 would help you get? Are you a rich guy who dabbles in sports photography? Are you gambling with your kid’s college tuition fund that you can make the money back before Jr is 18? Only you can answer this.

I however can dispel a few myths for you so at least you can make a somewhat informed decision. Photography doesn’t pay well. I imagine the income distribution in photography to be about the same as the world at large. You have a few at the top: celebrity fashion photographers aka the CEOs, high end wedding/commercial photographers and people lucky enough to have good staff photographer jobs aka the middle class, and then everyone else scraping by on crumbs. My first gigs in sports photography were shooting high school sports a few days per week for a small chain of local papers at $100 per game. While this is no way to make a living, it supplemented my income, got me real-world experience, and qualified me for membership in Nikon Professional Services. After a couple of seasons doing this, I had the opportunity to shoot pro and major college games for a sports picture wire service that fed to all of the big magazines and newspapers. They paid nothing up front and split the sales 50/50. Like everyone else at that point of the journey, I was really excited about shooting at a higher level, and wasn’t upset about the terms because I figured that the sales would more than make up for it.

Turns out I was late to that party, as the internet had already begun killing magazines & newspapers and the budgets for the ones that remained. The wire dropped prices and made deals that resulted in the pictures being almost given away. I stopped looking at statements after a while because there are only so many $1.50 sales split two ways that I could stomach. I moved away from this model as quickly as I could. The fact of the matter is that pictures are a commodity. There are far too many photographers at the average pro/college game for the pictures to have any scarcity at all. Whether you’re shooting for Getty for a few hundred dollars for 50 pictures per game or shooting on spec for next to nothing, you’re not going to finance a $7,000-$12,000 lens like that. Day rates for bigger magazines range from $750-$1,500 (in my experience) but these are tougher to come by to the point that it would still be very difficult to fund a 400.

The last stand for making significant money in the sports game is commercial photography. People who need pictures for advertisements, corporate websites, packaging, point of sale, etc will still generally pay for quality because they recognize that they are choosing a face for their product or service, and not just any face will do. Hook up with the right clients, and yes, you can fund a 400 with no problem. And this brings us thankfully back to the actual mission here, making great unique pictures. Since sports pictures are a commodity, the only way to break free of the commodity market is to make special pictures as a rule. Every time out, try to get something that no one else will think of so that eventually when editors come looking at your work, they see that there is no substitute for your eye and your brain, hence no substitute for your pictures. This is what gets you more gigs, and less dependent on sales that could be settled with coins.

*Please Read Below*

Big Lens Fast Shutter is funded solely from the pockets of Ryu Voelkel and Matt Cohen. If you think the information we give you about sports photography is making you a better sports photographer and as a result a well balanced human being, please show us your appreciation by clicking on the “Donate” button and send some of your hard earned dollars/euros/Brixton pounds our way. People who donate will be mentioned on our next show unless you want to remain anonymous. Thank you for supporting us and may the force of sports photography be with you, always.
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Training Ground: August-September 2014

Here is the August-September 2014 Training Ground video.

Please don’t forget that Training Ground will be posted in the middle of the month and it will not come out at the same time as the podcast. Therefore, the next deadline for submission is mid-November.

If you want to participate in Training Ground, please go here: Big Lens Fast Shutter Flickr Group

Enjoy the pain. :)

*Please Read Below*

Big Lens Fast Shutter is funded solely from the pockets of Ryu Voelkel and Matt Cohen. If you think the information we give you about sports photography is making you a better sports photographer and as a result a well balanced human being, please show us your appreciation by clicking on the “Donate” button and send some of your hard earned dollars/euros/Brixton pounds our way. People who donate will be mentioned on our next show unless you want to remain anonymous. Thank you for supporting us and may the force of sports photography be with you, always.
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Podcast: Episode 41 – Get Closer

Podcast: Episode 41 – “Get Closer”

Listen and download links here:

- Subscribe and listen via iTunes (We’ve re-published our audio feed, but you may need to unsubscribe and resubscribe. Technology is fun!)
– Get RSS feed
– Get MP3 (Click to listen or right click to save it to your computer)

News

Matt talks about the change in seasons from rodeo to football, and Ryu moans about shooting the softball and golf. Also we talk about the Big Lens Fast Shutter group on Flickr and our goals for it and how you need to participate.

Master Class
We preview the next You Win witha talk about the importance of getting closer and showing detail in your pictures.

Training Ground
Training Ground is now on video. If you’d like to participate (and we think you should), enter your pictures in the Flickr thread and make sure to tag them BLFSTG201408.

Training Ground will now be split off from the podcast, and will run approximately two weeks after the podcast.

You Win

Our July / August 2014 themed competition was “Hot

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First place is this auto racing picture by Kenneth Armstrong

Second place is Bashar Alshabi.

Third place is Kevin Sousa.

The August/September 2014 themed competition is “Closer”. Goto our BLFS flickr group page for competition rules and to enter.

Cross-Counter

We went for golf this time, Ryu chose this one via XINHUA /LANDOV and Matt chose this one by Mark Pain.

Special thanks to…
Our producer Robb Massar
Icon by Arvin Bautista

*Please Read Below*

Big Lens Fast Shutter is funded solely from the pockets of Ryu Voelkel and Matt Cohen. If you think the information we give you about sports photography is making you a better sports photographer and as a result a well balanced human being, please show us your appreciation by clicking on the “Donate” button and send some of your hard earned dollars/euros/Brixton pounds our way. People who donate will be mentioned on our next show unless you want to remain anonymous. Thank you for supporting us and may the force of sports photography be with you, always.
Donate Button with Credit Cards

Podcast: Episode 40 – World Cup Edition

Podcast: Episode 40 – “World Cup Edition”

Listen and download links here:

- Subscribe and listen via iTunes (We’ve re-published our audio feed, but you may need to unsubscribe and resubscribe. Technology is fun!)
– Get RSS feed
– Get MP3 (Click to listen or right click to save it to your computer)

News

Due to our busy schedules we skipped a month. Matt talks about the ups and downs of the rodeo trail, and Ryu moans about shooting the World Cup in Brazil.

Master Class
We skipped Master Class this time to do a Q&A about Ryu’s trip to Brazil.

Training Ground
Training Ground is now on video. If you’d like to participate (and we think you should), enter your pictures in the Flickr thread and make sure to tag them BLFSTG201408.

Training Ground will now be split off from the podcast, and will run approximately two weeks after the podcast.

You Win

Our June 2014 themed competition was “Celebrations

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First place is this airborne celebration by Michail Bormin

Second place is split between Kevin Deadwylier and Andre Detoxx.

The July/August 2014 themed competition is “Hot”. Goto our BLFS flickr group page for competition rules and to enter.

Cross-Counter

Continuing the World Cup theme, Ryu chose this one by David Gray and Matt chose this one by Alexander Hassenstein.

Special thanks to…
Our producer Robb Massar
Icon by Arvin Bautista

*Please Read Below*

Big Lens Fast Shutter is funded solely from the pockets of Ryu Voelkel and Matt Cohen. If you think the information we give you about sports photography is making you a better sports photographer and as a result a well balanced human being, please show us your appreciation by clicking on the “Donate” button and send some of your hard earned dollars/euros/Brixton pounds our way. People who donate will be mentioned on our next show unless you want to remain anonymous. Thank you for supporting us and may the force of sports photography be with you, always.
Donate Button with Credit Cards

Who Did The Work?

A little while ago I had to meet someone in a part of town I don’t usually visit. The exterior of the building featured a really beautiful, detailed mural. I was early, so I looked around to see if I could get a decent phone picture of it for Instagram. The problem was that, being the city, there were utility poles, newspaper boxes, parked cars and trash cans blocking almost every angle. Worse, there weren’t any people walking by. In the couple of minutes I had, the best I could have done was a snapshot that said little more than “Hey, new part of town, check out this mural.”

I ended up not even making one picture of the mural. On the way home I considered why I didn’t, and of course thought about it through the prism of sports photography. Taking a snapshot of the mural in my view is akin to shooting a frozen action picture of a high-profile race car on a famous track. Yes, you did the work that earned you the credential, you bought your gear and learned how to use it, and you woke up early to beat the traffic to the track. But that frozen action picture of the car could have been made by anyone, and the reason the picture is even of marginal interest to anyone has nothing at all to do with you.

Here’s a picture I made years ago of Jeff Gordon at Infineon Raceway. No thought or skill went into making this picture, and just knowing that it is in my archive makes me cringe:

MC1_4809

Consider why anyone would respond to a picture like this:

  • The car company whose history in racing has earned them loyal fans.
  • The design team who figured out how to squeeze every aerodynamic drop out of the body.
  • The graphics team who figured out how to make the car look cool despite the need for several unrelated logos.
  • The (possibly unseen) driver who figured out how to work the media into making himself a celebrity.
  • The track designer who figured out how to make the course twist and turn yet still support insane speeds.
  • A thought experiment: Take away the work of other people and make a version of the picture at a local track; stock paint job on a street-legal car, weekend warrior driver, non-descript pavement. Then put the high-profile picture and the low-profile picture on your social media of choice and see what happens. Since the pictures are more-or-less the same, the difference in reaction can be attributed solely to the work of other people. And if you’re not adding anything more to the picture than being there and knowing how to use your gear, you can be replaced buy the guy standing next to you. And lots of guys who aren’t standing next to you but are trying to get there as quickly as possible.

    Big Lens Fast Shutter is here to help you rise above the common denominator. Had I been hired to make a picture of the mural, I could have rented a lift to get a more interesting angle, convinced the building to let me onto the roof, or waited there all day until something interesting happened in front of the mural. Likewise, trying to get interesting pictures of a motorsport race necessitates shooting in the garage/pit, setting up somewhere that lends itself to an interesting panning shot, using the background, figuring put how to get elevated, or using the light in an early morning/late evening qualifying session. It’s the difference between capturing something that someone else did and creating a picture that outlives any single race.

    My rule of thumb is this: If getting a specific shot was easy, it’s not a great shot, especially when the thing you are shooting will be in the exact same place every few minutes for two hours at a time. That’s not to say that laying in mud or on hot pavement, freezing on a mountain, or trying to stay upright in hurricane winds will necessarily result in a Pulitzer. But you’ll have less competition, the picture will probably be rarer, and you will have at least added something to the product.

    NASCAR Sprint Cup Series 2011 - June 26 - Toyota Save Mart 350

    Motorsports 2011 - May 14 - AMA West Coast Moto Jam

    Motorsports 2011 - May 13 - AMA West Coast Moto Jam

    MC1_2108

    Formula Drift - Locked and Loaded 83 - Michael Essa

    2009 NASCAR Toyota SaveMart 350 104 - Joey Logano pit crew

    2009 NASCAR Toyota SaveMart 350 100 - Kyle Busch pit crew

    robert doornbos at the san jose grand prix

    robert doornbos at the san jose grand prix

    simona de silvestro at the san jose grand prix

    The World Cup Review: What, When, and How

    It’s been a while. I really had to take a break from BLFS activities as it was nearly impossible to shoot that laughably small football tournament in Brazil whilst being a good host to the BLFS nation. So forgive me. Por favor.  And this is a long one so I suggest you make some tea or coffee before digging in.

    I thought I would talk about my experience as a professional freelance photographer shooting the world cup. Not the ones who work for an agency or a newspaper. Basically a backpacker’s guide to shooting the world cup. Beleza.

    Traveling
    First of all, I was there to shoot as many matches as possible. I estimated 21 and fell 1 short and ended up with 20. Why? I got killed by the fog in Curitiba which grounded my plane until the match in Belo Horizonte started.

    Basically you live and die depending on your flight. As I have experienced in Curitiba, if you are planning on shooting all 14 group stage matches in the first 2 weeks of the world cup, you will inevitably miss a match or two. Don’t sweat it. These matches are nowhere near as crucial as the matches in the latter stages, which is the tournament. Why? Because those are the ones that really count. And those are the ones you will see the agony of going home and the joy of sticking around for another match. Those are the ones with penalty shoot outs of which I have shot 6 of them. I think that’s a world cup record.

    If you got the time and not much money, take the bus. They are far more reliable than the airplane, but obviously take more time. Had I known prior to arriving in Brazil that buses between Sao Paulo, Rio, and Belo Horizonte can be had as low as 70 Reais (bit more than 20 EUR), I would have saved a lot of money. Another advantage of buses over flights are that you don’t have to goto the airport. Most airports are far and sometimes in another city. Make sure you understand how long it will take to get to the city from the airport. Case in point: Congonhas airport is NOT in Sao Paulo. Just like Tokyo Disneyland is NOT in Tokyo. Google maps is your friend. Do your research. Oh that’s hurting my ears…

    Taxis. If you want to get to a world cup stadium, you need to take one, but you also need to walk. As with South Africa, there was a perimeter blockade on all the stadiums in Brazil. That means you have to walk, sometimes more than 3km. With your gear. So no fatties and slobs and dudes with bad knees need not apply unless you are working for Getty. Then you get a private bus from the airport that takes you directly to the stadium. With a cup of tea while you’re at it.

    One other way to get to the stadium is to get on the bus from one of the FIFA media hotels. You do not need to be staying in one to reap the benefit of this wonderful bus that takes you directly in front of the media centre, but it will be best to stay close to one. Make sure you know the bus schedule as some of them only go once every 60 minutes instead of the more normal every 30 minutes.

    I’m also going to include the lodging part of it. If you don’t have the money to stay at hotels, you can stay in hostels. I don’t recommend it because you have expensive gear with you. Without your gear, you cannot shoot. If you cannot shoot, what the fuck are you doing at the world cup?. What I did was to register and contact people via Couchsurfing.com. If you are lucky, you get to stay at someone’s house. For free. But if you use this service, please be courteous. This is not a free hotel service. You will not be alone, but you will be with the people who are kind enough to let you use their space. Bring a gift. Offer to take out the garbage. Dance your country’s traditional dance to the samba. Appreciate their hospitality.

    The massive advantage of a service like Couchsurfing is that you will get to stay with a local. Locals who know a place or two about the city you will be staying. This brings me to…

    Access
    No, not at the stadiums because that’s reserved for Getty photographers. I’m talking about shooting places where you have no access to, such as the favela. I for one promised some people that I won’t be going there because A) it’s stupid B) it’s just dumb C) it’s not safe. But I do things whenever I feel like it. So I went. But not before taking every possible precautions. You need to find someone who is inside the said community. They know some people, went to school with them, supplies drugs for them. Whatever. Because the difference between you ending up in a ditch, robbed of your gear (once again, no gear no shooting) and you getting shots most people will die for, is the connection these people have with the dangerous parts of the city. Even so, be aware. Don’t flaunt your gear. When you’re not shooting, put it in a bag. Not a photo bag, but a normal bag where you can take your camera in and out quickly. Don’t take too much gear either. Keep it simple. Body and 2 lenses. Also dress like you don’t have much money. Don’t dress like a hobo or don’t smell like one. But dress like you could need a shave and a haircut.

    Language
    You are in another country where your fucking language is not the one they use. Tough. Learn it. It will be the difference between you getting a great shot on a local futsal court versus them ignoring your request to shoot the sole of their feet. Doesn’t matter if your Portuguese is not perfect. If there is a will, there will be conversation. They will appreciate you more if you see that you are trying. Language is not about getting it right. It’s how much you want the other person to understand what you want. Keep things simple. Use your hands. Your legs. Whatever. Get your point across. You make your luck and this will be one of the most important elements when you are shooting off the beaten track.

    Gear
    Bring as much as you can. You are not going to go home for one month and daddy and mommy aren’t going to be sending your 70-200 f2.8 in the mail. But you mustn’t forget the biggest advantage of a tournament this size. Gear rental. Yes, N and C will lend you gear. You want that 600 f4? Sure. 1DX? Absolutely. But be aware that they will lend you one body and one lens per match. Maybe they will throw in a teleconverter if you smell good Needless to say, it’s not a be all end all service and therefore you should bring your own gear as well.

    And if you are Japanese, they will take really really really good care of you. I know this because I am one. And they LOVE you more than your significant others can ever love you. I have no idea why there is such a love affair between the N and C and Japanese photographers. but take advantage of it. Another reason to learn Japanese besides wanting to watch anime and read manga. Case in point: I got to trade in my 2 x 32GB XQD card for a 2 x 64GB XQD card. Bless them.

    But remember, you will only get to rent it for the match and you’ll have to give it back at the end of that match. Subsequently if the match is a significant one, it will bring in more photographers than the norm, (in my case anything involving Brazil). Then severe gear shortage. Also expect not to get a D4s, but a D4 or a D3s if you don’t queue. Or nothing at all. The rule of thumb is to use the N and C services only in emergency. But feel free to get your gear cleaned and checked. It’s also free. And so are their rain covers.

    Backup
    You are not going home for a month. Bring two physical backups. Sleep with them. Don’t let them out of your sight. But try not to coddle them too much. They need discipline.

    Clients
    This really depends. This time the most important client was myself. I kept all my good stuff because you know, I’m making a book (www.ryuxrio.com). But this is an anomaly. In most cases, you will have couple of clients you need to tend to. You will need to be aware what they want. Action? Fans? Beautiful fans? More beautiful fans? More beautiful fans with less clothes? What format? What size? Captions or no captions? Before the match? At half time? After the match? As most of my clients are magazines, I didn’t have to send them like the Getty guys do(and I really sympathise with their plight. They work like dogs out there), but I had some hard deadlines, some of them 30 minutes after the match. Remember that you don’t like penalty shootouts. Because they will significantly reduce your time to meet your deadline.

    Media ticketing
    This is the crux of the world cup. Stupid amount of time and energy are spent on media ticketing. First, if you manage to convince FIFA that you are important enough to them, you will get an accreditation. That is step 1. Next you need to apply for a media ticket for the individual matches. You do that through the FIFA media portal. Then they will send you an email telling you if your request has been accepted or rejected. You will also be told which priority group you will belong to for the this match. Unless you’ve been a bad boy or a girl, you will get into all the matches EXCEPT for the final. More on that later.

    Before we go any further, let’s talk about the priority groups. You belong to priority group 1 if you belong to a media of one of the two countries playing that match. If it is Uruguay v Greece and you are a Greek photographer (you’ve got nice long shiny hair), you will be in priority group 1. Group 2 is all about the host media. Yes, that’s Brazil to you and me. Doesn’t matter if you can use a camera, you will still get a chance to pick ahead of people who know what bulb or teleconverter is. Priority group 3 belongs to countries that are involved in the world cup. Even if you are Japanese and you suck at football, you will still be in this group. Group 4 are for the true losers, countries not involved in the world cup. Therefore if you are Zlatan, you will be in group 4 shaking your head left in right in utter disgust.

    Once you have been accepted, you will goto the stadium. You will need to goto the photographers’ ticketing desk and receive a number in your priority group. Around 4 hours before kickoff, they will start calling your number. Priority Group1 number 1, Priority Group1 number 2, Priority Group1 number 3, and so forth. Once your number has been called up you get to select your seat on the pitch. You will be shown a map of the stadium and you can sit wherever you want as long as no one else is sitting there. This goes on until group 1 is done. Then off to group 2 and so on.

    I apologise if this portion of the post is coming across as boring as boring can be. I said it was important. I never said it was exciting.

    You will be stuck in your seat for 90 minutes and further if it goes to extra time and penalties. So you need to really think about 1) When things will happen 2) What you want to shoot 3) How you want to shoot. When, is predicting when they will score. If you think Uruguay will score because Suares is concentrating more on football than biting someone then you might want to sit where Uruguay will be attacking in the 1st half. If he bites someone in the 2nd half closer to a Greek goal, you’re out of luck. But, let’s say you want to shoot the Greek attackers tending to their beautiful locks. Then you will sit on the Greek attacking side in the first half and pray that Suares doesn’t bite you in the 2nd half.

    The best chance of capturing the celebrations after the goal and general good action shots is the position next to the goal. If you want the players to be moving east west whilst attacking the goal, you should sit on the side of the pitch. If Neymar (Jr) had a healthy back, you will also want to be on the side of the pitch and not next to the goal. And that is another component you want to consider when selecting your seat. The celebrations after the goal. Neymar (Jr) is notorious for thanking the man up top right next to the touchline. So if you think he will score and if you want to shoot him celebrating you have to go on the side. You’ll be fucked if he doesn’t score, but you don’t know this until he doesn’t score. :)

    The Final
    Basically if you don’t belong to the media of the two countries that are playing (Germany and Argentina), if you don’t belong to the media of the host country (Brazil), if you don’t belong to a major news agency (AFP, Reuters, AP, etc… Getty is the official photo agency so they are in no matter what), you are fucked. Some of my Japanese colleagues were wait listed and eventually got onto the pitch, but the same could not be said for me in South Africa. 4 years ago I ended up shooting from the tribune and when you shoot from there, you stay there. Even when for the cup presentation you stay there. The only thing to be said here is that hope you were born into a country that plays good football. Therefore if you’re English, you’ll never shoot on the pitch.

    Well that was long. I think I covered everything and everything else.
    “But where are the photos Ryu? Why aren’t you sharing them with us? Where are they, you fucking bastard!”

    Well this bastard will not be showing the majority of the photos this time around for free because I’m a horrible person who wants to sell my book. It’s www.ryuxrio.com. Please consider buying one. For a taster please goto Ryu’s flickr page.

    Obrigado for reading this atrociously long post. Hope this will spawn multiple freelance photographers who will one day get rejected by FIFA. I’m going to go play with my cats now.

    Ryu
    worldcupblfs

    Podcast: Episode 39 – Keep It Clean

    Podcast: Episode 39 – “Keep It Clean”

    Listen and download links here:

    - Subscribe and listen via iTunes (We’ve re-published our audio feed, but you may need to unsubscribe and resubscribe. Technology is fun!)
    – Get RSS feed
    – Get MP3 (Click to listen or right click to save it to your computer)

    News

    Matt has been on the road in the thick of California rodeo season. Ryu talks about his (now funded) Kickstarter Campaign to fund his world cup book.

    Master Class
    Our super producer Robb threw us a question about gear cleaning. Matt does it himself, Ryu sends it in every time.

    Links to the supplies that Matt mentions:
    Giottos Rocket Air Blaster
    Copperhill SensorSweep
    Eclipse solution
    Visible Dust UltraMXD-Vswab

    Training Ground
    Training Ground is now on video. If you’d like to participate (and we think you should), enter your pictures in the Flickr thread and make sure to tag them BLFSTG201405.

    Training Ground will now be split off from the podcast, and will run approximately two weeks after the podcast.

    You Win

    Our April 2014 themed competition was “Patterns

    First place is open this month.

    Honorable mentions go to Sleelio and Jimmy.

    The May 2014 themed competition is “Celebrations”. Goto our BLFS flickr group page for competition rules and to enter.

    Cross-Counter

    Ryu chose this picture from The Masters by Harry How, and Matt chose this Boston Marathon picture by Mary Schwalm.

    Special thanks to…
    Our producer Robb Massar
    Icon by Arvin Bautista

    *Please Read Below*

    Big Lens Fast Shutter is funded solely from the pockets of Ryu Voelkel and Matt Cohen. If you think the information we give you about sports photography is making you a better sports photographer and as a result a well balanced human being, please show us your appreciation by clicking on the “Donate” button and send some of your hard earned dollars/euros/Brixton pounds our way. People who donate will be mentioned on our next show unless you want to remain anonymous. Thank you for supporting us and may the force of sports photography be with you, always.
    Donate Button with Credit Cards

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